Speaking in August 2016

I know this is a tad late, but there have been some changes, etc. recently, so apologies for the delay of this post. I still hope to meet many of you to chat about MySQL/Percona Server/MariaDB Server, MongoDB, open source databases, and open source in general in the remainder of August 2016.

  • LinuxCon+ContainerCon North America – August 22-24 2016 – Westin Harbour Castle, Toronto, Canada – I’ll be speaking about lessons one can learn from database failures and enjoying the spectacle that is the 25th anniversary of Linux!
  • Chicago MySQL Meetup Group – August 29 2016 – Vivid Seats, Chicago, IL – more lessons from database failures here, and I’m looking forward to meeting users, etc. in the Chicago area

While not speaking, Vadim Tkachenko and I will be present at the @scale conference. I really enjoyed my time there previously, and if you get an invite, its truly a great place to learn and network.

What’s next

I received an overwhelming number of comments when I said I was leaving MariaDB Corporation. Thank you – it is really nice to be appreciated.

I haven’t left the MySQL ecosystem. In fact, I’ve joined Percona as their Chief Evangelist in the CTO Office, and I’m going to focus on the MySQL/Percona Server/MariaDB Server ecosystem, while also looking at MongoDB and other solutions that are good for Percona customers. Thanks again for the overwhelming response on the various social media channels, and via emails, calls, etc.

Here’s to a great time at Percona to focus on open source databases and solutions around them!

My first blog post on the Percona blog – I’m Colin Charles, and I’m here to evangelize open source databases!, the press release.

Changing of the guard

I posted a message to the internal mailing lists at MariaDB Corporation. I have departed (I resigned) the company, but definitely not the community. Thank you all for the privilege of serving the large MariaDB Server community of users, all 12 million+ of you. See you on the mailing lists, IRC, and the developer meetings.

The Japanese have a saying, “leave when the cherry blossoms are full”.

I’ve been one of the earliest employees of this post-merge company, and was on the founding team of the MariaDB Server having been around since 2009. I didn’t make the first company meeting in Mallorca (August 2009) due to the chickenpox, but I’ve been to every one since.

We made the first stable MariaDB Server 5.1 release in February 2010. Our first Linux distribution release was in openSUSE. Our then tagline: MariaDB: Community Developed. Feature Enhanced. Backward Compatible.

In 2013, we had to make a decision: merge with our sister company SkySQL or take on investment of equal value to compete; majority of us chose to work with our family.

Our big deal was releasing MariaDB Server 5.5 – Wikipedia migrated, Google wanted in, and Red Hat pushed us into the enterprise space.

Besides managing distributions and other community related activities (and in the pre-SkySQL days Rasmus and I did everything from marketing to NRE contract management, down to even doing press releases – you wear many hats when you’re in a startup of less than 20 people), in this time, I’ve written over 220 blog posts, spoken at over 130 events (an average of 18 per year), and given generally over 250 talks, tutorials and keynotes. I’ve had numerous face-to-face meetings with customers, figuring out what NRE they may need and providing them solutions. I’ve done numerous internal presentations, audience varying from the professional services & support teams, as well as the management team. I’ve even technically reviewed many books, including one of the best introductions by our colleague, Learning MySQL & MariaDB.

Its been a good run. Seven years. Uncountable amount of flights. Too many weekends away working for the cause. A whole bunch of great meetings with many of you. Seen the company go from bootstrap, merger, Series A, and Series B.

It’s been a true privilege to work with many of you. I have the utmost respect for Team MariaDB (and of course my SkySQL brethren!). I’m going to miss many of you. The good thing is that MariaDB Server is an open source project, and I’m not going to leave the project or #maria. I in fact hope to continue speaking and working on MariaDB Server.

I hope to remain connected to many of you.

Thank you for this great privilege.

Kind Regards,
Colin Charles

com.apple.bird getting large?

I was wondering why my disk space was reducing pretty quickly on my Mac, and it turns out my ~/Library/Caches/com.apple.bird/ directory was 92GB in size! Inspecting some of the larger files, I notice that it has a WhatsApp header, which suggests that these are my WhatsApp iCloud backups.

There obviously seems to be some kind of bug as I have files, one per day, from sometime in April. They all start around 800MB and grow to 2GB in size. Each.

It seems like there are other files there too, and I wasn’t sure if deleting it would just make sense. The solution? System Preferences -> iCloud then toggle iCloud Drive off. There is a warning about how it will delete all iCloud documents from your Mac. Its all good considering this is supposed to be saved in the cloud right? Restart it, and voila, you see the directory go down to 0 bytes.

Something up with the bird daemon? I don’t know if brctl would help in any way, so I’m happy there’s an easier way to recover lost space.

Apple’s problem – lacking roadmaps

I’ve been an Apple Mac user for a very long time. I didn’t buy the first iPhone (still believing in Nokia and loving the idea of the open Android, and the second phone was the BlackBerry) personally getting on the bandwagon with the iPhone 4. I did buy the first iPad, at a huge 64GB, because it was the only one available on day 2 of the launch.

In recent times, my main Mac has been the MacBook Air. I have a retina iPad Mini and an iPhone 6 Plus. I also sport an Apple Watch. I am generally satisfied with the Apple ecosystem.

However, I’m in the market for new hardware. I’m quite satisfied with the iPhone 6 Plus, so I have no idea if I’ll get the next iPhone that gets released in 2016. Pricing does play a role – a 64GB iPhone 6s Plus is RM4,199! When I bought the 64GB iPhone 6 Plus, the Ringgit-USD exchange rate was a lot better and it only cost me RM3,149 (really on the upper band of what I’d want to pay for a mobile phone that gets about 2 years of use; the 64GB iPhone 6 used to cost RM2,749).

So what do I want? An iPad Pro with a keyboard is likely something I will grab in due time (probably the 9.7″ version since I’m OK with the old size). Do I buy it now, considering its got a different release cycle compared to its bigger brother?

I would love to grab a MacBook and a Mac Mini, but I want to see if there are new updates to the MacBook Air or if that line gets killed (major reason: retina display). And as of this writing, the Mac Mini hasn’t been updated for 655 days. I’m mixed between that and an iMac to be honest. Its all about the fact that I will get more storage out of these machines (512GB on the MacBook Air/MacBook just isn’t enough!)

The MacRumors Buyers Guide states that everything is either a don’t buy/caution/neutral, with the exception of the MacBook (which as I said, has a retina display but brings other pain over my MacBook Air that I’ll have to price in).

NYT says Apple’s iPhone Sales Drop Again, but Services Are a Bright Spot, while Business Insider says It’s time to take a serious look at Tim Cook’s leadership of Apple. The WSJ reports In China, Apple’s Local Competition Takes a Bite Out of Its Revenue. Bloomberg reports Apple’s China Problem Is That Local Phones are Good — and Cheap.

Which brings me to the main point of what I’m after: clear roadmaps. We need modern hardware and predictable release cycles. Because everyone wants to buy the latest, greatest, piece of hardware since these prices don’t go down and Apple doesn’t discount. I think I’m not alone in wanting this, enterprises want this too (in addition to amazing turnaround times for warranties).

I hope Apple goes back into some cycle of predictability even if they don’t release roadmaps. Like we all know we get a new iPhone in September. I’d like this replicated for Macs as well as iPads. This will ensure they probably start churning out better quarterly results as people start planning their purchases.

Generation Gap: Venmo

Last week I was having dinner in NYC. We were a table of four, and the table next to us, in cramped eating conditions in Koreatown, were two girls whom were in their twenties.

When it was time to get the cheque, we split the bill using cash and card. When it was time for the table next to us to pay the bill? One paid it, and the other said “OK, how much do I have to Venmo you now?”

Generation gap! I don’t even have Venmo. It was also timely to read this New Yorker piece, The Venmo Request: A New Wrinkle In Modern Dating, which apparently suggests that this is also becoming prevalent when it comes to dating! Choice quote: “A guy who seeks recourse through Venmo the morning after is a guy who doesn’t think he got his money’s worth the night before.”

I’m all for going cashless and splitting bills using something like Venmo. That was in effect the promise of the PayPal mobile app. My friends and I still end up using cash, and if its a bigger road trip, bank transfers. It seems that Venmo is currently USA only, but considering Braintree acquired Venmo in 2012, and PayPal got Braintree in 2013, its kind of a shame that its 2016 and they’ve not branched out of the USA.


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