Posts Tagged ‘SkySQL’

MariaDB now in the AWS Marketplace

Saw this on @awsmarketplace the other day:

Now on the AWS Marketplace, you can get MariaDB 5.5.32 on Ubuntu 12.04, CentOS 6 and Debian Wheezy. These are eligible for the Amazon free tier as well.

Would love to see people use this and to provide feedback. Do we need to expand this to offer Cassandra integration so you can spin up a basic cluster and get it going? Would you love to see this integration with Galera Cluster?

Much thanks to SkySQL for making this possible.

Change in Affiliation

About a month ago, I accepted an offer to work at SkySQL as the Chief Evangelist for MariaDB. So the change in affiliation announced in April 2013 has come to fruition. What this realistically means is that my email address changes to colin@mariadb.com, though I am still reachable at colin@mariadb.org even though I’m not part of the MariaDB Foundation.

There are a lot of structural changes that urgently need work and I expect to be spending quite some time on all this. In the meantime, read an update from the SkySQL CEO Patrik Sallner.

Immediate thoughts on Business Source Licensing

Sunrise at SanurI just got back from a vacation to see articles about Business Source Licensing. I’ve divided my thoughts into four parts here: Opensource and its merits, Is unpaid opensource usage bad?, MariaDB’s “Problem”, Business Source Licensing. If you haven’t read them yet, here’s some mandatory reading:

  1. Open source: Its true cost and where it’s going awry by Monty Widenius
  2. MySQL Co-Founder Wants You To Pay Up For Open Source

There is much abuzz on Twitter as well. From the likes of Mike Olson (who is right, MariaDB may have issues that are different to other OSS products – no two OSS projects/products are alike), to a lengthy conversation between Jim Jagielski & Matt Asay, as well as another conversation spurred by Matt Asay.

Now for some of my own commentary.

Opensource and its merits

Companies have been heavily using opensource and the reason they like this is because it is open. They don’t pay for licenses like proprietary software. They use opensource because they don’t have to pay for support, services, or anything around it. Countries have pro-opensource policies so that they can empower local citizens and further strengthen their sovereignty. This is what makes opensource popular: the fact that the software comes to you with many freedoms.

Is this bad for companies building businesses around opensource software products? Well, kind of. It means you have to provide real value before someone decides to pay you. And if for some reason you price yourself out of the market, companies choose to hire resources internally. This is the beauty of opensource. Many companies I know have started to use RHEL licenses from Red Hat; once they decide they see less value from the updates or the knowledgebase, they switch to CentOS at their next cycle. No problem there.

Is unpaid opensource usage bad?

I’m going to say that I disagree with Monty and think that he is wrong here:

“The more people are using it and, in these cases, abusing the whole idea of open source by not paying back either with development or money to help projects, it is actually destroying open source.”

I really don’t think opensource is destroyed by having many users and lacking corporate sponsors. This is the way of opensource and has been for a long time. Apple makes use of CUPS to ensure printing works – they did so long before they hired their main developer. We all benefitted from Samba which is how we talk to Windows printers/shares/etc. which had no real commercial company around it (Linuxcare, then IBM, then other providers funded the work). LibreOffice has always existed with lots of work by various distributors of OpenOffice.org (via the ooo-build system), which is why the project took off so fast.

MariaDB’s “problem”

When there is commercial need for opensource, the corporate sponsors will arise. It takes a long time to get to a stage where you are going to get profitable in an opensource services or infrastructure company. Red Hat didn’t get to a billion dollars overnight. Neither did MySQL.

I will not comment on the financials of Monty Program, SkySQL or how tough it has been to bootstrap the MariaDB project because I clearly am privy to information there. I am particularly proud of how we’ve done a relatively great job at getting MariaDB users and distribution, all on a bootstrap marketing/PR budget with no professional help :-) However, I will reminisce another day.

Simply put: if Oracle stopped producing opensource MySQL or decided that they would shut it down, there would be immediate need for MariaDB and the corporate sponsors would come in throngs. The truth is that Oracle continues to produce MySQL as an opensource product. It may not be a full opensource project (internal trees, delayed public pushes, private bugs database, internal mailing lists, etc.) that follows “the architecture of participation”, but it is still an opensource product. This is what has enabled people to take MySQL and extend it further. Look at the Facebook 5.6 tree, or the Twitter 5.5 tree.

There is talk about the dual-licenses that MySQL chose to use. I remember a time when the connectors were LGPL. They were then relicensed as GPL. They still are. But I think we effectively nipped this with the: MariaDB LGPL Java client, MariaDB C Client Library, and the BSD drizzle stuff.

Business Source Licensing

Now for the bits on business source:

“The whole idea with business source is actually very trivial. It is a commercial licence that is time-based and which will become open source after a given time, usually three years. But you can get access to all the source. You can use it in any way but the source has a comment that says you can use it freely except in these circumstances when you have to pay,” Widenius said.

“You’re forcing a small part of your user base to pay for the restrictions, which can be if you’re making money from [the software], if you have more than 100 employees, or you’re a big company or something like that. So you’re forcing one portion of your users to pay. But because it’s time-based, everybody knows that you can still contribute to the project,” he said.

“Because you have the code, you know that if the vendor does something stupid, somebody else can give you the support for it. So you get all the benefits of open source except that a small portion of users has to pay. As long as you continue to develop the project, each version still gets a new timeline of three years.”

Hmm. I see many people commenting that MariaDB might become business source licensed. I am here to tell you that MariaDB is GPLv2 software. It will stay GPLv2 software.

Reading the definition of business source licensing, it is nothing like what Matt Asay portrays it to be:

“Business source is simply proprietary software released under a Microsoft-esque shared source license that magically becomes fully open source after a period of time.”

I’m sorry but the description above is pretty clear. This is nothing like Microsoft shared source. It is code that becomes licensed under an OSI-friendly license after a time-period; however everyone using the software gets the code. How does one enforce payments? I don’t know. What are the conditions requiring you to pay? I don’t know.

At this stage, I am open to thoughts on such a licensing model but I have no firm thoughts on this myself. The best description of how this works is given above by Monty.

Update: Sun 2 Jun 2013 17:33:53 MYT Monty has an update on business source licensing in a comment on Matt Asay’s column.

Biggest MySQL related news in the last 24 hours, Day 2

Continuing on from yesterday, the biggest news that I’ve noted in the past 24 hours:

  1. The commitment from Oracle’s MySQL team to release a new GA about once every 24 months, with a Developer Milestone Release (DMR), with “GA quality” every 4-6 months. Tomas Ulin announced MySQL 5.7 DMR1 (milestone 11) [download, release notes, manual]. He also announced MySQL Cluster 7.3 DMR2 [download, article]. Needless to say, 5.7′s code isn’t pushed yet to lp:mysql-server/5.7. Of notable mention were the statistics around MySQL 5.6 of worklogs, bugs fixed, etc.
  2. The MySQL Applier for Hadoop which uses the binlog API to stream to HDFS.
  3. The media was all over the SkySQL-Monty Program merger, so today its just links: TechCrunch, ZDNet, ArsTechnica, Wall Street Journal (WSJ), PC World, The H, and in one of my favourite newspapers, The Financial Times (FT).

Did I miss any other important announcements/news bits?

Biggest MySQL related news in the last 24 hours

For me, the biggest news in the last 24 hours so far has been:

  1. SkySQL merges with Monty Program, developers of MariaDB. This of course affects me directly and leads to a change in affiliation in a few months.
  2. TokuDB goes opensource. I think this is really big news. Beyond just the fact that it can now be a storage engine in the main MariaDB tree, I love the work they’re doing to extend it to be an engine for MongoDB as well.
  3. Continuent Tungsten Replicator is now 100% opensource. Now you can extract data in real-time from Oracle, so think of this as Golden Gate without a price. I like this move.
  4. Wikipedia adopts MariaDB. Again, this is important and its also important that we have the MariaDB Foundation in place.

I expect a lot more interesting news to happen in the next 24-hours, so lets see if I wake up at 4am to postulate tomorrow.

Upcoming talks in Santa Clara

I’m planning my calendar and thought I’d share what talks I’d be giving in Santa Clara in a couple of weeks for the Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2013 and the MySQL & Cloud Database Solutions Day 2013. Its going to be a busy April 22-26 2013.

  1. MariaDB Cassandra Interoperability with Sergei Petrunia on 23 April 1:20pm – 2:10pm @ Ballroom D
  2. MariaDB BoF on 23 April 6:00pm – 7:00pm @ Ballroom F
  3. MariaDB 10.0 & What’s New With The Project with Monty Widenius on 24 April 11:10am – 12:00pm @ Ballroom C
  4. MHA: Getting started & moving past the quirks on 25 April 1:50pm – 2:40pm @ Ballroom B
  5. Why MariaDB, and what is new? panel with Rasmus Johansson, Sergei Gobubchik, Ivan Zoratti at 9.30am on 26 April
  6. MariaDB Galera Cluster Overview with Henrik Ingo, Max Mether at 11.15am on 26 April
  7. MySQL and Cassandra Integration with Sergei Petrunia at 1pm on 26 April

Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo, April 22-25, 2013

Come along, use code SponsorSQL to get a 15% discount to Percona Live. The SkySQL Cloud day on the 26th is completely FREE so register now!


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